Wanna live longer?

Did you know that higher intake of legumes is the greatest dietary predictor of survival in the elderly*? That's right--people who eat more beans may live longer. And you don't have to eat hills of beans to get the benefit; researchers found that eating less than an ounce of beans/day conferred an 8% reduction in risk of death. That's a lot of life for a little legume!

NOT eating beans may even be detrimental to your health. A bean-free diet has been found to significantly predict all-cause mortality**. 

*I. Darmadi-Blackberry, M. Wahlqvist, A. Kouris-Blazos, et al. Legumes: the most important dietary predictor of survival in older people of different ethnicities. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2004;13(2):217-20.

**W. Chang, M. Wahlqvist, H. Chang, C. Hsu, M. Lee, W. Wang, C. Hsiung. A bean-free diet increases the risk of all-cause mortality among Taiwanese women: The role of the metabolic syndrome. Public Health Nutr 2012 15(4):663 - 672.

Bean Up

Weight Down

 

Beans are high in soluble fiber, which slows digestion and makes you feel satisfied longer. This is only one of the many reasons that people who eat beans regularly have smaller waists on average and are 22% less likely to be obese than folks who don't eat beans*.

 

 

*Papanikolaou, Yanni, and Victor L. Fulgoni III. "Bean consumption is associated with greater nutrient intake, reduced systolic blood pressure, lower body weight, and a smaller waist circumference in adults: results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2002." Journal of the American College of Nutrition 27.5 (2008): 569-576.

What else are beans good for?

​Blood Pressure

Regular bean consumption has been linked to lower blood pressure*. In fact, people who don't eat beans were found to have 4X the risk of high blood pressure than bean eaters**!

Cholesterol

A mere half-cup of pinto beans/day was found as effective at lowering total cholesterol and LDL as a leading prescription drug***--only without the side effects! The study's authors concluded, "Pinto bean intake should be encouraged".

Reduced Risk of Breast Cancer

High fiber intake is associated with lowered risk of breast cancer. **** High-fiber foods like beans help moderate glucose levels, reduce circulating estrogen levels, and contain angiogenesis inhibitors--all of which aid in decreasing cancer risk.

Colon Etc.

Beans and other legumes  are rich in fiber and resistant starch, which help keep blood glucose, blood pressure, and LDL cholesterol down, promote weight loss, promote colon health, and nourish the microbiome.

 

*Papanikolaou, Yanni, and Victor L. Fulgoni III. "Bean consumption is associated with greater nutrient intake, reduced systolic blood pressure, lower body weight, and a smaller waist circumference in adults: results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2002." Journal of the American College of Nutrition 27.5 (2008): 569-576.

**Miller, William L., Benjamin F. Crabtree, and David K. Evans. "Exploratory study of the relationship between hypertension and diet diversity among Saba Islanders." Public Health Reports 107.4 (1992): 426

***Winham, Donna M., Andrea M. Hutchins, and Carol S. Johnston. "Pinto bean consumption reduces biomarkers for heart disease risk." Journal of the American College of Nutrition 26.3 (2007): 243-249.

****Dong JY, He K, Wang P, et al. Dietary fiber intake and risk of breast cancer: a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies. Am J Clin Nutr 2011. Aune D, Chan DS, Greenwood DC, et al. Dietary fiber and breast cancer risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies. Ann Oncol 2012.

* * * * *Papanikolaou Y, Fulgoni VL, 3rd. Bean consumption is associated with greater nutrient intake, reduced systolic blood pressure, lower body weight, and a smaller waist circumference in adults: results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2002. J Am Coll Nutr 2008, 27:569-576. Jayalath VH, de Souza RJ, Sievenpiper JL, et al. Effect of dietary pulses on blood pressure: a systematic review and meta-analysis of controlled feeding trials. Am J Hypertens 2014, 27:56-64. Bazzano LA, Thompson AM, Tees MT, et al. Non-soy legume consumption lowers cholesterol levels: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Nutrition, metabolism, and cardiovascular diseases : NMCD 2011, 21:94-103. Sievenpiper JL, Kendall CW, Esfahani A, et al. Effect of non-oil-seed pulses on glycaemic control: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled experimental trials in people with and without diabetes. Diab tologia 2009, 52:1479-1495.

The Original Bean Bar Co.

Morro Bay, CA 93442

info@wellbean.life